Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 15

Finding the Right Community

by Page Plager

I'm going to let you in on a secret; there's more to buying a home than simply loving the home itself.

Shocked? Of course you're not.

Just like us, you've heard "location, location, location," so you know that the surrounding community is just as important as where you sleep at night. But you may not know exactly what you should look for, so we've come up with a short list of things you should think about before putting an offer on that dream home.

Think of the Children!

If have children, or will in the future, it's important to know how active the streets are in your future neighborhood. You want your children to be safe when playing or walking near your home, so take a few trips to the area at different hours of the day to see how traffic flows. You can also ask neighbors and they'll generally give you an honest assessment. It's also a good idea to see if there are speed bumps or signs in the area to alert drivers of children. Keep an eye out to see how well-lit the streets are as well.

But It's So Far Away...

There are those that love living out in the solitude of the wilderness, but for many others they like having stores, schools, parks and other amenities readily available. You should time your trips, during heavy traffic times, from your prospective house to other areas that you'll frequent. You'll be able to decide whether or not you're too close, too far away, or just right when it comes to these times.

Remember, the closer you are to a major road, the likelier you are to hear that highway or interstate traffic at night. It's also pertinent to know if businesses in your area have early open or late closing times, especially if you have a job that isn't the traditional 9-to-5.

Safety First

In today's society, it's especially important to know who you're going to live by and what support is offered in the area. You can find out tons of information online about crime statistics (including sex offenders in your area), efforts on recycling, distance to hospitals, availability of public transportation and local ordinances. Talk to your local alderman's office, town hall or council meetings to learn more. You may even be able to talk to the neighborhood watch if one is available.

Keep Fun Close

If you and your family are always looking to have a little fun, it's important to know if there are parks, sports teams, or other activities in the area. You don't want to have to drive across the city, or country, just to have a good time.

Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Image courtesy of Unsplash/Pixabay.com

Choosing Between a House Vs Condo

by Page Plager

On our quest to find the perfect home, debating whether to purchase a house or a condo sometimes factors into the debate. Sure, there are lots of factors that make this an easy decision for some—kids, location, money, space—but for others there isn't a black or white answer.

That's because each has its advantages and disadvantages. Let's take a look at some of those now.

Traditional House (Pros and Cons)

Houses are traditionally more appealing to the "do-it-yourself'ers" and those with children because they have the advantage of having total remodel power over every inch of the house, without having to worry about consent from others—homeowners association rules aside. This allows for more flexibility when it comes to children and pet accommodations, as well as more room both inside and out. This also means that your neighbors generally don't live close enough to know what you're having for breakfast just by peering in a window.

But there are also drawbacks to homeownership, mainly in the form of effort. When you own your own home, you're required to perform (or pay for) maintenance on your yard and trees, which means you have to purchase equipment and tools to keep up with things. Then it not only becomes a financial investment, but a time investment as well. Utility bills can also be higher due to the size of a house.

Condominium (Pros and Cons)

There's a growing sect of people that pushed for more urban living, giving rise to larger and larger cities. The appeal of living in these close quarter areas is the accessibility of stores, restaurants, sports facilities and other amenities. If you're one of the many that struggle to find free time each day, condos can be an attractive choice for their convenience and low-maintenance living. And because you're only responsible for the interior of the condo, association fees cover exterior concerns such as a structural damage and lawn care, leaving you more time to enjoy the area.

Just like owning a traditional home, condos have a few drawbacks. Remember those association fees we talked about earlier? Well, these are extra fees that are in addition to your monthly mortgage payment. Think of them as H.O.A. fees, but for your condo. Oftentimes these may not be a set fee, and can fluctuate depending on needed maintenance. Not to mention that you're continuously surrounded, elbow-to-elbow, with all your neighbors. If you don't particularly like that neighbor that blares music until the early AM, you better hope that your homeowners’ rules have something that can help you.

It's Easy, Choose More Pros

There are pros and cons to every situation, you just have to determine which cons you can live with, and which pros you most look forward to enjoying. Both housing situations can be perfect depending on your lifestyle. Just remember that when the pros outweigh the cons, the cons will eventually start to dwindle away. Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Image courtesy of grendelkhan/Flickr.com

Getting the Best Deal on Your Dream Home

by Page Plager

​Competition is generally considered a healthy, natural happenstance in life. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for buyers looking into real estate. That's because the more people there are bidding on your dream property, means there's the less chance of getting a great deal on it.

There may not be a better time to get in on the action. Why? Economists believe—and rightly so—that the rise and fall of the real estate market holds a close relationship to the rise and fall of employment rates. That's why it's especially important to be cognizant of the job market in your area; you'll want to get the best deal while you can.

Here are five things you should know as a buyer that will help you negotiate the best real estate deal:

1) If you find that house you're looking for, look for comparable sales in the area. There's nothing worse than insulting a seller with a lowball offer before you've even done your research. A good seller will know what houses in his/her market are going for, so don't try to outsmart them.  

2) There are other ways to get the "discounts" you're looking for. In your proposals ask for things that you'd like to see done, or left in the house. Keeping appliances and other amenities in the home, or cutting out dead trees in the backyard, are both good ways to save money on changes or additions you'd make anyway. Getting these into the agreement (on the buyer's dime) can help you save on your bottom line anyway.

3) Combine our first two tips with this one: find out why the seller is getting rid of the home in the first place. If you find out if it's because of job relocation, divorce, retirement or any number of other factors, you may be able to come to a better understanding which often means a better deal.

4) Determine whether you want an established home or a fixer-upper. Houses can sometimes be priced comparably even though one may need significantly more work than another. Understanding property values in your area can help.

5) Don't get caught holding all the cards. Remaining in a bidding war over a few thousand dollars is meaningless on a 30-year loan, especially if the house you're looking at it is your dream home. It's OK to stand your ground for a good deal, but don't run yourself out of the deal by asking for too many things at once.

Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Image courtesy of Mark Moz/Flickr.com

How to Find the Right Neighborhood

by Page Plager

Finding the perfect home is about more than just bedrooms, baths, walk-in closets and a formal dining room; the neighborhood is equally if not more important than all those things.

But how do you research a neighborhood if you don’t live nearby or have friends in the area?

Fortunately, it’s gotten much easier that it was in the past when word of mouth was the only option.

Start with an online search. Go to your preferred search engine and type in the name of the neighborhood. You will instantly see a list of reviews and perhaps even a neighborhood message board describing what the people that live there or have visited think about the area. Take these with a grain of salt, but they are a great way to get a “feel” for the area.

If you are considering buying a house in a neighborhood with which you are unfamiliar, talk to the neighbors after you view the house. Likely, they are out in the yard or walking down the sidewalk. Say, “Hello,” and ask them how they like the neighborhood and let them know you are considering moving close to them. People love to talk about their neighborhood, and you will likely get an honest, unbiased opinion of the neighborhood from those that live there that are not trying to sell you anything. A smile can go a long way.

It is normal and preferable to keep an arm’s length relationship with the sellers of a home. It helps during the negotiation process, but asking the sellers about the neighborhood is normally an acceptable question. Ask about commute times, good restaurants or how the schools are; most of the time, if they want to sell the home, they will be more than happy to answer.

Where you live is as important as what you live in; please, don’t forget to do your due diligence regarding neighborhood selection. It will cost you nothing and I am sure you will enjoy your home more if you are in a neighborhood that meets your needs rather than one that does not.

Contact me today if you want to know about schools, zoning or anything else to do with a neighborhood or area. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Kevin Poh/Flickr.com

Consider Resale Value Before Buying

by Page Plager

It’s hard to imagine ever selling the home you just spent so much time and effort acquiring, but for most Americans, another move is inevitable – it’s only a matter of time. Families grow, families shrink and people change jobs. It’s rare these days to stay in the same home for 25 years.

So, even though finding the ideal home for you and your family should be your end goal, it pays to consider the possibility of how other potential buyers will respond to your home in the future.

Tastes may change over the years, but there are several factors that are found in homes with a high resale value consistently. If you hope to sell your home quickly and for a profit in the future, it pays to keep these four factors in mind when investing in a home.

A Prime Location

Absolutely nothing tops location in the real estate industry – why else would people pay thousands of dollars to live in a shoebox apartment in Manhattan? If your home is in a prime location, the odds are it will sell quickly and for a premium. Of course, like many things, a prime location is in the eyes of the beholder, but, typically, you cannot go wrong with good schools, convenience to nearby shopping and services, low crime rate and walkability.

A Great View

A nice view can sell your home when all else fails. People like the idea of stepping out onto their porch or balcony and seeing something beautiful each morning. You probably do too.

Now, depending on whether you are in the city or in a more rural area, your definition of a “great view” may vary. City dwellers like to be up high and overlook the skyline. Those in rural areas like to stare at the beauty of nature. One thing is for sure, the view of a brick wall or a gravel pit rarely meets anyone’s definition of a “great view”.

A Great Layout

Layout is an important factor as well. In fact, you might remember that the number of bedrooms and baths was one of the first things you considered when determining which homes belonged on your “must see in person” list. Beyond just number of beds and baths, the feel and flow of a home can play an important psychological role when selling a home. You want a home that has a floor plan that makes sense, feels larger than it is and incorporates natural light.

A Great Façade

How a home looks from the outside can plays an important role in generating interest among potential buyers. Homes that make a great first impression from the street tend to sell faster and for more money than those that don’t. So, if you plan to resell your home in the future, consider investing in a home with the potential for great curb appeal or one that already has it.

The four factors listed here are very important when investing in a home you intend to resell sometime in the future, but a much easier method is to simply remember what attracted you to the home in the first place. Trust your instincts. If the home attracted you, it will likely attract others in the future. Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find the home of your dreams.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Simon Cunningham at Flickr.com

First Time Buyer's Loan

by Page Plager

The process of obtaining financing to buy a home is certainly more difficult than it was ten years ago – especially for first time homebuyers.  Fortunately, many states as well as the federal government offer loans specifically tailored for the first time home buyer.

Can You Qualify for a First-Time Homebuyer Loan?

Typically, first-time homebuyer loans are reserved for those who have never had their name listed on a deed of any kind, but that is not a hard and fast rule. It’s best to verify with each individual lender that you qualify as a first-time homebuyer under their lending restrictions.

What Are the Advantages of a First-Time Homebuyer Loan?

Typically, the lending restrictions for a first-time homebuyer loan are less restrictive than a traditional loan. This means that they typically require a lower credit score, offer a lower rate of interest, lower down payment requirements, fewer fees and closing costs and allow a higher debt-to-income ratio.

Obviously, you can see how this type of loan can be advantageous. If you do not have time to save up for a large down payment (FHA first-time homebuyer loans only require a 3.5% down payment), have less than great credit or do not have the ability to pay a high rate of interest, this type of loan might be your best – or only – option.

What Are the Disadvantages of a First-Time Homebuyer Loan?

Of course, nothing is every 100-percent good, and that rule applies to loans for first-time homebuyers as well. These loans do come with a few disadvantages, and in order to make the right decision, you need to know the pros as well as the cons.

Since most first-time homebuyer loans are backed by the FHA, the fall under the same lending cap as other FHA loans. This means that you can only borrow up a certain amount – depending on the median income in your area. Even in the most affluent areas such as Miami, New York and Los Angeles, the amount a homebuyer can borrow is capped at $625,000.

The home you purchase must also be used as your primary residence. So, you cannot use this type of loan to purchase rental property – though there is some leeway if you are purchasing a duplex or triplex.

It can be difficult to refinance a home purchased using this type of loan – especially if refinancing involves changing the terms of the loan.

These drawbacks might seem relatively minor when compared to the benefits, but they are still restrictive and could affect you in unforeseen ways a few years down the road.

First –time homebuyer loans are an excellent way to get into the real estate market, and they have many appealing features. Talk with your lender about this and other options and make sure to weigh the pros and cons before making a decision that will affect your life for years to come. Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Alex Skopje at Flickr.com.

What to Know About Closing Costs

by Page Plager

There are obvious costs included in buying a home such as the price of the home, the required down payment and the interest rate of the mortgage, but there are hidden costs that are often overlooked by first-time, and even experienced homebuyers.

One of these hidden costs is the closing costs associated with buying a home. Closing costs is a catchall category that covers a variety of small additional fees associated with closing a home such as running a credit report, processing fees, legal fees, inspections, appraisals, title searches and recording fees. While none of these fees are large in and of themselves; when added together, closing costs can often amount to two to five percent of the total purchase price of the home. Depending on the cost of the home, this can be a significant amount.

Reducing Your Overall Closing Costs

While closing costs are typically the buyer’s responsibility, there are ways to offset or split your closing costs.

In some cases, the seller will split a portion of the closing costs. While this was more common several years ago, it is still possible today. You should discuss the possibility of splitting the closing costs with your Realtor. Let her broach the subject with the seller and gauge their willingness to cover a portion of the closing costs in order to complete the sale.

Some lenders also offer “no closing costs” mortgages. While these seem great on the surface; it’s important to read the fine print carefully. Some lenders will roll the closing costs back into the structure of your loan – which could mean you pay much more than you would after factoring in the cost of interest. This is another example of when the services of a qualified Realtor that understands loans and the mortgage industry can prove invaluable.

It’s Best to Save and Plan Ahead

The days of the zero-down mortgage are largely over. Typically, if you want to purchase a home, you will need to save for a down payment. Rather than be shocked by the amount you are expected to pay at closing, avoid the need to scramble at the last minute by saving an additional five percent on top of the amount you will save for your down payment. So, if you will be saving $10,000 as a down payment on a $100,000 home, add an additional $5,000. If you are fortunate and do not need the entire amount to cover closing costs, you have a little extra money in the bank to cover the cost of moving and furnishing your new home, and that’s never a bad thing.

Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, and help you start the home buying process.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Dan Moyle/Flickr.com

Tips for Boosting Your Credit Score

by Page Plager

In today’s market, your credit score is more important than ever. A difference of just a few points can mean a lower interest rate over the life of a loan – saving you thousands – or the difference between the approval and denial of your loan application.

That is why it is important to do everything you can to boost your credit score in the months leading up to applying for a home loan.

Here are five things you can do to potentially boost your credit score.

Check the Accuracy of Your Credit Reports

By law you are allowed to request one free credit report each year, so go ahead and request your credit report several months before you intend to apply for a loan. According to an eight-year study released by the FTC, 25 percent of consumers identified errors when they reviewed their credit reports. That’s a staggering number when you consider that even a small error can have a significant impact on your credit score.

Fortunately, you are allowed to dispute inaccuracies in your credit report and credit monitoring agencies are required to address any disputes in a timely manner.

So, before doing anything, request your credit report from all three agencies and check that it is accurate.

Reduce Your Credit Card Balance

Lenders typically do not look favorably on large credit card balances. If you use credit cards regularly, reduce your balance to 10 to 30 percent of your limit a few months prior to applying for a loan.

Ask for Late Payment Forgiveness

At one time or another, most of us have been late paying a bill – especially during the recent economic downturn. What most people don’t know is that they can request a “goodwill deletion” from a company and remove the black mark from the credit report entirely. Many companies are willing to do this for their customers if the late payment was a one-time occurrence. It never hurts to ask.

Keep Your Accounts Open

Reducing credit card debt is good; closing credit card accounts is bad. Length of credit history is factored into your overall credit score and can account for as much as 15 percent of the total number. If you close old, established accounts your credit score could suffer even though you have less debt.

Pay All Bills on Time

Recent activity is often more important than what you did several years ago. If you have a few bad spots in your credit history, do your best to pay your bills on time and in full for several months before applying for a loan. This will demonstrate to lenders that you are not a credit risk as well as boosting your credit score a few points.

Repairing damaged credit takes time. It’s not something that can be done in a few weeks. So, get started early – at least three to six months before you plan to buy a home – to give your efforts time to bear fruit. Contact me today for a consultation. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have and/or help you find your dream home.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Simon Cunningham at Flickr.com.

Preparing for the Final Walkthrough

by Page Plager

For many homebuyers, the last step prior to sitting down at the closing attorney’s office is the final walkthrough. This is the last chance for you to view a home before it officially becomes yours, and it’s a time to make sure that everything is as it should be.

Typically you want to schedule a final walkthrough as close as possible to closing – normally within 24 hours – but some experts advise scheduling two walkthroughs if major repairs are to be made to the home. The first, about a week prior to closing, to establish that required repairs are completed or near completion and the second, within 24 hours of closing, to ensure that all items to remain are present and in good working order.

Things to Do on Your Final Walkthrough

  • Do bring your home inspection report, copy of contract and seller’s disclosure form so you know what items were to be repaired, what items are to remain with the home and any other items that you need to pay special attention to on your walkthrough.
  • Do check that all items (window treatments, appliances, pieces of furniture and fixtures) that are to remain are still present in the home. If not, and you have it in writing that they should remain, have your agent contact the seller immediately.
  • Do check that there are no unwanted items left behind. It’s the sellers’ responsibility to remove their unwanted furnishings – not yours.
  • Do check all appliances to ensure they are in working order.
  • Do check the HVAC unit to make sure it is still heating and cooling properly.
  • Do check outlets with a handheld tester (found in any hardware store) to ensure they are all in working order.

What If You Find a Problem?

First, it is important to understand that contracts typically stipulate that a home be “broom” or “vacuum” clean – neat but not immaculate. So, making a fuss over the cleanliness of a home likely isn’t worth it unless it is very dirty.

Second, minor things like a blown light bulb or light damage to the walls or doorframe as a couch was moved, probably are not worth delaying closing. In the long run, it’s cheaper and easier to just fix these minor problems yourself.

But if you find a major problem such as a missing item, leak or hidden defect that will negatively affect the value of the home, contact your real estate agent immediately to begin the process of coming to an agreement on repairing the problem.  The sooner you make that call, the better.

In the end, it is up to you to decide what is important enough to delay closing and what is not. Contact me if you would like to go over this information. I will be happy to discuss any questions you may about the home buying process.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Jason Jones at Flickr.com.

What to Know About the Appraisal Report

by Page Plager

A residential real estate appraisal is a crucial step in the loan-making process. Without an appraisal, most lenders will not even consider making a loan. They need an expert opinion of value in order to feel comfortable allowing a piece of property to serve as collateral.

Most of the time, the lender will order the appraisal from an independent appraisal company, but it’s not unheard of for the homeowner to order an appraisal for a variety of reasons including insurance purposes.

The most common form of residential appraisal is the Fannie Mae Form 1004 or Uniform Residential Appraisal Report.  Typically, this form is used when the lender or homeowner requests a “full appraisal” since it requires an interior and exterior inspection.

Most of the time, the lender and homeowner are only concerned with the box labeled “market value”, but it pays to understand how to read an appraisal report so you understand how the appraiser arrived at his opinion of value.

The First Page

The first page of a Uniform Residential Appraisal Report will identify the property and detail any improvements on the property. There are a variety of ways to identify the property such as property address and legal description. Make sure the property identified is the correct one. If not, the entire appraisal is invalid.

In addition to identifying the property, there will be sections describing the neighborhood and your home in detail. This is how the appraiser identifies the characteristics of the appraised property so that comparable properties can be found and evaluated.

The Second Page

This is the most important page – and the most confusing for many homeowners. It’s on the second page that you will find the chart listing all the comparables and the adjustments. Essentially, the second page is a way for an appraiser to “show his work” and justify his opinion of market value.

In most cases, the comparables will be sales from within the last six months and within a half-mile radius of the subject property. This prevents the need for the appraiser to make any significant adjustments based on time and neighborhood.

The values of the comparables begin as the listed sales prices, and those values will be adjusted based on how they compare to the subject property. The gross adjustments will then be added or subtracted from the sales prices to arrive at the adjusted values. If the gross adjustment is too high, a lender may not accept the appraisal.

The appraiser then uses these adjusted values to arrive at his opinion of the subject property’s market value.

In addition to market value an appraiser may provide a cost value and an income value. The cost approach is normally used to estimate replacement costs for insurance purposes. The income approach is used to evaluate the estimated value of income producing properties such as rental homes.

The Other Pages

There are other pages beyond the first two pages of the appraisal report. In these pages you will find supporting documents such as sketches of the subject property, photos of the subject property and surrounding neighborhood, any contracts that were considered during the appraisal process and copies of any other pertinent documents.

Appraisers are experts at evaluating properties. They are trained to do their jobs well, but they do occasionally make mistakes.  Everyone does. Understanding how to read a Uniform Residential Appraisal Report will help you to spot those mistakes and bring them to the lender’s attention before they become an issue or have the peace of mind that the appraisal is accurate.

Are you ready to buy a home?  If so, contact me for a consultation.  I’m happy to answer any questions you may have and help you get the home buying process going.

Page Plager and Blaise Bugajski
Property SELLutions
Ph: 770-639-SOLD
Info@PropertySELLutions.com
www.PropertySELLutions.com

Contact us today if you are looking to buy or sell a home in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia area - including North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County or Dekalb County.

Photo courtesy of Fannie Mae.

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 15

Syndication

Categories

Archives

Licensed in the State of Georgia
 

Page and Blaise Plager are the owner/agents of Property Sellutions.  We provide real estate services in Greater Atlanta, Georgia and the surrounding communities North Fulton, Forsyth County, Gwinnett County, Cobb County, Dekalb County,
Hall County, Glynn County, and The Golden Isles


 

We list and sell residential real estate including single family homes, condominiums, townhomes, rental property,
investment property, vacant land and lots for sale in the Great Atlanta, Georgia area.